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Inside Out

You can live to 120

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(Part II)

There is a new paradigm to living in the 21st century.  And it requires a way of thinking that is both challenging and liberating.

There is a number we assign ourselves every time our birthday comes along, based on our birth certificates.

When we think linear, time becomes a progression forward. Thus, the numbers add up. Assuming one has embraced a wellness lifestyle, health experts believe that  the human life span could reach the age of 120.

But Deepak Chopra goes further than lifestyle discipline. We all know the basics: good nutrition, sleep, exercise, multimineral/vitamin supplementation, healthy habits that include no smoking and controlled alcohol intake.

What if we think in a parallel manner? Adopting this new mind-set sounds something like this: the years do not sum up to a number, but rather a sense of fullness, or even ripeness. Much like a fruit, we are ready for the picking. Thus, the question is, how ripe are you?

In his book “Ageless Body Timeless Mind,” Chopra gives us an eye-opener. The target of 120 years may not seem all that impossible. Through a disciplined wellness approach, it can be done. Thus, once you accept 120 as a possible reality, it is only logical to embrace 60 as your midlife age. Therefore, 60 is the new 40.

Why? Because the average life span of mankind a decade ago was set at 80.

Think young

Suspend your usual way of celebrating birthdays and blowing the candles on your birthday cake. Why not simply place one single candle to symbolize the oneness of who you are and what you have become?

Mind-body connection

It takes a special kind of outlook to think young. It has to do with the delicate connection between mind and body. It is unbreakable and undeniable.

The intricate synergy between both is so real that the mind can influence the body so strongly toward wellness or illness. And should you be physically ill, the body can heal itself with the help of a positive frame of mind.

Brain power

The focus on the mind leads us to the brain and its state of health. Dr. Eric Braverman, author of “Younger You,” explains that one is as young as the oldest part of the body. This is where the brain, mind and hormones are seriously considered. Simply put, he says that if you keep the brain young, the body can delay the aging process.

All things considered, here are the things that count: nutrition, lifestyle and hormones. It is possible through nutritional therapy to reverse health challenges like diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

Eating “natural medicine” found in herbs and vegetables like raw basil, garlic, onion, ginger, chili and cinnamon add flavor to food and contribute to your healing.

Add carrots, oranges, tea, leafy greens and sprouts to the list of powerful antioxidants.

The Age Print is a picture of the state of health of your organs. Through sophisticated blood tests, PET scan and transcranial ultrasounds, many unexpected tragic situations like aneurysms can be prevented. He suggests bio-identical hormone replacement therapies, and bone scans at age 30 (early detection for osteoporosis).

One of the stars in his list of minerals is zinc.

Did you know that there are a hundred different enzymes in the body that need zinc? Natural sources are oysters, meat, liver, seafood, wheat germ, brewer yeast, pumpkin seed, nonfat dried milk and ground mustard.

As the popular saying goes, you are what you eat.

Today’s affirmation: “I welcome only the best in my life.”

Next week: Stem cell therapy


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