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Custom-built, personalized furniture that doesn’t scrimp on quality, design

Sigvard Collections offers stylish, well-crafted furniture pieces that appeal to individual tastes

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MODERN velvet sofa is teamed with classic coffee table with turned legs and antique brass handles.

BATWING tufted armchair in velvet is given a modern twist with square wings and nail heads.

Creating something out of the ordinary is getting more challenging for the furniture industry. As interior designer Sigvard “Jigs” Adefuin ventures into opening a store at LRI Design Plaza, he is faced with the tough task of producing furniture that strikes an emotional resonance with the users.

Called Sigvard Collections, it is designed to suit several taste preferences. Although there are different home settings that represent various styles, from neoclassical to pop, the designs are familiar. Furniture pieces are also well-crafted by artisans from Pampanga.

Adefuin described how his store came about. Since existing stores couldn’t provide the styles clients wanted or offered items that were way beyond their budgets, he thought of a setup in which he would design the furniture, source the upholstery and have them customized.

“We aim to give the clients value for their money,” said the designer. For instance, a sofa, made of walnut leather and rich velvet upholstery, fetches P21,000.

BLACK satin-finish tabletop brings out the glassware and silver, and contrasts the Arturo Luz painting, which is part of Sigvard Collections.

Adefuin said his clients’ ideal home should exude a warm, welcoming and polished look. Hence, designs cater to what appeals most to Filipinos—brown wood, timeless styles and sleek, rounded corners that evoke intimacy.

Some designs inject Art Deco influences such as geometric patterns and seats that are somewhat curved inward. Others are imbued with French characteristics such as delicate, feminine lines and curvaceous legs and Tuscan fluted edges and rustic finish.

For clients with modern tastes, there are streamlined styles, flat-armed sofas, and ottomans suitable for condominium living.

VELVET brocade chairs complement the classic demilune console. PHOTOS BY PATRICK UY

Adefuin puts a twist into the classic wingback chair by adding nail heads. The batwing armchair is wittily modernized by shaping the normally round wings into squares that resemble horse blinders.

Moreover, one can have a choice of the California coastal styles, which use lighter wood, or Manhattan style which is characterized by black and polished surfaces.

Adefuin said the furniture industry should stand some improvements. “The proportions are all wrong and the finishes of the wood are second-rate,” he said.

He explained he is upping the ante by utilizing quality lumber such as Philippine mahogany. He said Sigvard furniture wood is kiln-dried. The lumber is placed in a temperature- and humidity-controlled kiln to absorb the moisture content. This process prevents the wood from warping, enabling it to last longer and making it suitable for construction.

The furniture is also held together by  pegs, nuts and bolts that not only allow the furniture to carry extra weight but also provide them a seamless look.

Sigvard Collections is at G/F, LRI Design Plaza, Nicanor Garcia St., Bel-Air, Makati; tel. 8901058.

MANHATTAN Collection is done in black satin finish.

SCROLL-PATTERN bed in velvet goes with Art Deco side tables.


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  • Olibo

    Nothing extra ordinary about these furnitures.



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