Penang Goong | Inquirer Lifestyle
Saturday, August 18, 2018
Close  
  • share this
STEP BY STEP

Penang Goong

By: - Reporter
/ 02:15 AM March 02, 2017
t0302reyes-thaicooking_5

Dried Penang Curry with Prawns and Kaffir Lime Leaves

If it’s not spicy, it’s not Thai food!” declares Peninsula Manila’s Spices Thai specialty chef Phaithoon Atthasarn. In his country, he says, at least 12 to 15 chili peppers are blended into a Thai dish to ensure its savory goodness.

In Manila, he has had to adjust a bit, adding only two to three chili peppers to accommodate those who aren’t into spicy food.

Yet, it doesn’t mean the authentic Thai flavor and taste have been diminished. Atthasarn says they also come from the meticulous preparation and mixture of ingredients that make up good Thai cooking.

ADVERTISEMENT

Peninsula Manila is sharing the rudiments of Thai cooking in “Thailand on my Plate” on March 3 and 17, 3-5 p.m. at Spices Pavilion under the tutelage of Atthasarn.

The Thai cooking class, part of the Peninsula Academy Cooking Class Series, will feature simple, home-style Thai dishes such as Som Tam Marako (Spicy Green Papaya Salad with Roasted Nut), Penang Goong (Dried Penang Curry with Prawns and Kaffir Lime Leaves) and Khao Niew Ma-Muong (Ripened Mango and Sticky Rice).

The cooking class, priced at P2,017 net, includes a traditional Thai-style family dinner in Spices Garden, The Peninsula Academy apron and a special gift. An add-on feature is a short demo on Thai-inspired alcoholic cocktails, plus a combo of tequila and lemongrass-infused gin and tamarind syrup and coconut syrup.

Khao Niew Ma-Muong (ripened mango and sticky rice)

Khao Niew Ma-Muong (ripened mango and sticky rice)

The jovial Atthasarn, who’s been in Manila for a number of years, will explain the ideal use of fresh Thai herbs like galangal and kaffir lime, the long and short of using double-boiler for sticky rice, and the importance of using traditional wooden mortar and pestle in producing tangy curry paste.

“There’s always a homey feeling in preparing dishes the traditional way, like pounding instead of using a blender. The taste may be the same, but the personal satisfaction is different,” he says.

Here, Atthasarn demonstrates how too cook Penang Gook, one of the featured Thai dishes in his upcoming class. The coconut milk and kaffir lime leaves play a big role in balancing the spicy-citrusy taste and dense texture of the curry sauce. The peanut helps thicken the sauce.

Som TamMarako (spicy green papaya saladwith roasted nut)

Som Tam Marako (spicy green papaya salad with roasted nut)

Atthasarn says the Penang curry can be prepared from scratch by combining lemongrass, peppercorn, cilantro, shallots, garlic, salt, chili and other Thai herbs, and gently pounding them in a mortar and pestle. The mixture is left overnight to dry out.

The prawns are transferred to a bed of sweet basil and garnished with more coconut milk, kaffir lime leaves and chilies.

ADVERTISEMENT

Penang Goong

(Dried Penang Curry with Prawns and Kaffir Lime Leaves)

1 tbsp dried Penang curry

Phaithoon Atthasarn, PeninsulaManila's Spices Thai specialty chef, teaches simple, home-style Thai dishes.

Phaithoon Atthasarn, Peninsula Manila’s Spices Thai specialty chef, teaches simple, home-style Thai dishes.

½ c coconut milk

28 g small prawn

1 tbsp fish sauce

1 tbsp white sugar

5 g sliced red chili

5 g sweet basil

1 tbsp crushed peanut, roasted

3 g kaffir lime leaves

For “Thailand on My Plate,” call 8872888 extension 6694; e-mail diningpmn@peninsula.com; visit peninsula.com.

E-mail the author at vbaga@inquirer.com.ph

1. Using a saucepan on medium heat, add oil and cook the dried Penang curry for a few minutes. Add coconut milk and bring to a simmer.

1. Using a saucepan on medium heat, add oil and cook the dried Penang curry for a few minutes. Add coconut milk and bring to a simmer.

2. Add prawns.Season with fish sauce and white sugar to taste. Simmer over low heat until the prawns are cooked. Add sliced chili, sweet basil and peanut.

2. Add prawns. Season with fish sauce and white sugar to taste. Simmer over low heat until the prawns are cooked. Add sliced chili, sweet basil and peanut.

3. Place sweet basil on a platter and transfer the prawnmixture. Garnish with sliced chili and kaffir lime leaves.

3. Place sweet basil on a platter and transfer the prawnmixture. Garnish with sliced chili and kaffir lime leaves.

Follow @vangiebagareyes on Twitter
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.
View comments

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: Cuisine, Dishes, DIY, Food, food trip, Lifestyle, Penang Goong, Peninsula Manila, Recipe, Restaurant, spices, Thai, thai cuisine, Thai food, Thailand
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.
entertainment

“Watchmen” TV series gets 2019 premiere

August 18, 2018 04:51 PM

entertainment

Stan Lee gets 3-year restraining order against ex-adviser

August 18, 2018 04:46 PM

newsinfo

CHR initiates probe on arrest of Makati bar lawyers

August 18, 2018 04:45 PM

entertainment

A focused Mackenzie Phillips takes it one day at a time

August 18, 2018 04:38 PM

lifestyle

Helping kids ‘rebound’ through basketball

August 18, 2018 04:34 PM



© Copyright 1997-2018 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.