Pigilan o Sige Lang: which side are you on?

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MANILA, Philippines—Today’s moms are faced with tough decisions especially in cases where their children are concerned. Recent studies reveal that there is divisiveness among moms when asked whether they would let their kids indulge in experiential learning or restrict their activities in favor of easing household chores.

Research in child development states that children remember 10 per cent of what they read, 20 per cent of what they hear, 30 per cent of what they see, and a staggering  90 per cent of what they do. This study could not have been more accurate as 8 out 10 moms agree that the skills learned through play are irreplaceable by books, TVs and computers. In fact, 91 per cent of these moms played outdoors when they were young and 96 per cent of them say getting dirty was part of their childhood.

While mothers value these learning activities, they also cannot avoid worrying about dirt and stains. 7 out of 10 moms admit being annoyed when their kids go home with stains on their clothes. This is due to the fact that doing the laundry is their least liked task. About 89 per cent of mothers consider laundry as one of the two most disliked chores, and dealing with stained clothes doesn’t help change the statistics.

Two steps forward, one step back

A study conducted by the Ateneo de Manila University Fr. Jaime C. Bulatao, S.J. Center for Psychological Services reveals two main attitudes of mothers when it comes to child’s experiential learning – the “sige” moms and the “pigil” moms.

“Sige” moms are those who are practically open to all possibilities and means in which their kids can learn as much as they can about the world around them. They are hands-on moms who encourage their kids to engage in less structured activities even if it means getting dirty at the end of the day, which allows kids to explore freely and learn new things in the process.

“Pigil” moms, on the other hand, are more cautious and restrictive with the kind of activities their kids engage in. They constantly worry about the consequences of the children’s actions to the point of inhibiting their kids’ potentials that could otherwise be gained from playing.

Even though “pigil” moms are often viewed on a bad light, they also have valid reasons for setting parameters on what their children can do. Safety and health issues are among the factors that trigger this attitude towards play, not to mention the amount of dirt and stains that kids bring with them after letting them live out their little fancies.

Raising kids is a breeze

It is still a mother’s prerogative to raise and guide her children in a way she sees proper. Moms will always do what is best for her kids, but they also need to strike a balance between being a loving, “sige” mom and a responsible, “pigil” parent who upholds her standards when it comes to cleanliness.

To help moms cross that bridge, Unilever, one of the world’s leading consumer goods companies, introduces Breeze with ActivBleach, the new household companion that will add a new meaning to laundry. Developed with moms with growing kids in mind, the global brand has established itself as a thought leader in child development all over the world through its “Getting Stains is Good” campaign.

The thought-provoking platform conducted a study to get a clear picture of Filipino moms’ attitudes toward stains in relation to how they raise their children. Breeze aptly fills in the gap, encouraging moms with its battlecry: “Sige sa Mantsa!” Because it is an unbeatable stain removal detergent, it takes away mom’s worry of removing tough stains. With Breeze, moms can say “sige” to life experiences and learning for her children.

Whichever side of the fence a mom wishes to belong in, her undivided love and care for her children should rule the day. Children only get to be young once in their lifetime, and to let them indulge in the joys of experiential learning is key to shaping their future. (advt)

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