In photos: Gay couples rejoice after US Supreme Court ruling | Inquirer Lifestyle

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George Harris, left, 82, walks out of the Dallas County Clerks office showing his marriage license as his husband Jack Evans, holding roses, 85, follows behind Friday, June 26, 2015, in Dallas. Harris and Evans were the first same sex couple to be married in Dallas after receiving their license. Gay and lesbian Americans have the same right to marry as any other couples, the Supreme Court declared Friday in a historic ruling deciding one of the nation's most contentious and emotional legal questions. Celebrations and joyful weddings quickly followed in states where they had been forbidden. AP

In photos: Gay couples rejoice after US Supreme Court ruling

Same-sex couples won the right to marry nationwide Friday as a divided U.S. Supreme Court handed a victory to the gay rights movement, setting off a jubilant cascade of weddings in states where they had been forbidden. The ruling, which will put an end to same-sex marriage bans in 14 states, was criticized by some religious organizations.

 

Here is a selection of AP photos that capture the historic day:

 

TVJ

 

George Harris, left, 82, walks out of the Dallas County Clerks office showing his marriage license as his husband Jack Evans, holding roses, 85, follows behind Friday, June 26, 2015, in Dallas. Harris and Evans were the first same sex couple to be married in Dallas after receiving their license. Gay and lesbian Americans have the same right to marry as any other couples, the Supreme Court declared Friday in a historic ruling deciding one of the nation's most contentious and emotional legal questions. Celebrations and joyful weddings quickly followed in states where they had been forbidden. AP
George Harris, left, 82, walks out of the Dallas County Clerks office showing his marriage license as his husband Jack Evans, holding roses, 85, follows behind Friday, June 26, 2015, in Dallas. Harris and Evans were the first same sex couple to be married in Dallas after receiving their license. Gay and lesbian Americans have the same right to marry as any other couples, the Supreme Court declared Friday in a historic ruling deciding one of the nation’s most contentious and emotional legal questions. Celebrations and joyful weddings quickly followed in states where they had been forbidden. AP
Crystal Zimmer, left, and partner Lena Williams hold hands after being married at Hamilton County Municipal Court, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Cincinnati, after the Supreme Court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. Ohio was one of 14 states enforcing a ban on same-sex marriage. AP
Crystal Zimmer, left, and partner Lena Williams hold hands after being married at Hamilton County Municipal Court, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Cincinnati, after the Supreme Court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. Ohio was one of 14 states enforcing a ban on same-sex marriage. AP
Brad Sanders, right, wipes tears from his face as he embraces his partner Michael Perez after they and Kenneth Denson, left rear, and Gabriel Mendez, center rear, hold hands following the Supreme Court news allowing same sex marriages Friday, June 26, 2015, in Dallas, at the county clerks office. AP
Brad Sanders, right, wipes tears from his face as he embraces his partner Michael Perez after they and Kenneth Denson, left rear, and Gabriel Mendez, center rear, hold hands following the Supreme Court news allowing same sex marriages Friday, June 26, 2015, in Dallas, at the county clerks office. AP
Amanda Ward, left, and Amanda Green, right (holding baby McKenna Ward), apply for a marriage license at the Pulaski County Court House Friday, June 26, 2015 in Little Rock, Ark. following a ruling by the US Supreme Court that struck down bans on same sex marriage nation wide. AP
Amanda Ward, left, and Amanda Green, right (holding baby McKenna Ward), apply for a marriage license at the Pulaski County Court House Friday, June 26, 2015 in Little Rock, Ark. following a ruling by the US Supreme Court that struck down bans on same sex marriage nation wide. AP
Jessica Chesnutt, visiting from Brooklyn with her wife for Pride weekend, cheers outside of City Hall in San Francisco, Friday, June 26, 2015, following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that same-sex couples have the right to marry nationwide. AP
Jessica Chesnutt, visiting from Brooklyn with her wife for Pride weekend, cheers outside of City Hall in San Francisco, Friday, June 26, 2015, following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that same-sex couples have the right to marry nationwide. AP
A man takes a photo of a large rainbow flag hanging at City Hall in San Francisco, Friday, June 26, 2015, following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that same-sex couples have the right to marry nationwide. AP
A man takes a photo of a large rainbow flag hanging at City Hall in San Francisco, Friday, June 26, 2015, following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that same-sex couples have the right to marry nationwide. AP
Ann Sorrell, 78, left, and Marge Eide, 77, of Ann Arbor, a couple for 43 years, embrace after exchanging vows in Ann Arbor, Mich., following a ruling by the US Supreme Court that struck down bans on same sex marriage nation wide Friday, June 26, 2015. AP
Ann Sorrell, 78, left, and Marge Eide, 77, of Ann Arbor, a couple for 43 years, embrace after exchanging vows in Ann Arbor, Mich., following a ruling by the US Supreme Court that struck down bans on same sex marriage nation wide Friday, June 26, 2015. AP
Lori Hazelton and Stephanie Ward are the first same-sex couple to receive their marriage license on Friday, June 26, 2015, in Muskegon, Mich. AP
Lori Hazelton and Stephanie Ward are the first same-sex couple to receive their marriage license on Friday, June 26, 2015, in Muskegon, Mich. AP
Elaine Cleary, of Chicago, who goes to college in Ohio, reacts as she hears the news outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, that the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. AP
Elaine Cleary, of Chicago, who goes to college in Ohio, reacts as she hears the news outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, that the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. AP
Sally Waters, left, kisses her wife Susan Waters with their daughter Jade between them, Friday, June 26, 2015, following a news conference to mark the Supreme Court's declaration that sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. AP
Sally Waters, left, kisses her wife Susan Waters with their daughter Jade between them, Friday, June 26, 2015, following a news conference to mark the Supreme Court’s declaration that sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. AP
PFLAG members Betty Lynch, left, Carmel, Ind., and Annette Gross of Indianapolis, hug during a press conference in the Indiana Statehouse Rotunda in Indianapolis, Friday, June 26, 2015, after the Supreme Court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. AP
PFLAG members Betty Lynch, left, Carmel, Ind., and Annette Gross of Indianapolis, hug during a press conference in the Indiana Statehouse Rotunda in Indianapolis, Friday, June 26, 2015, after the Supreme Court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. AP

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