Danes, once again, take top spot in world happiness report | Inquirer Lifestyle

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This audio book cover image released by Audible Inc. shows "Hamlet: Prince of Denmark," by A.J. Hartley and David Hewson. Audible Inc., the world's largest seller of downloadable audiobooks, has followed the success of their recent novelization of "Macbeth" with a new thriller about the moody prince of Elsinore. The book released Tuesday, May 20, 2014, is narrated by "The Hobbit" actor Richard Armitage. AP

Danes, once again, take top spot in world happiness report

This audio book cover image released by Audible Inc. shows "Hamlet: Prince of Denmark," by A.J. Hartley and David Hewson. Audible Inc., the world's largest seller of downloadable audiobooks, has followed the success of their recent novelization of "Macbeth" with a new thriller about the moody prince of Elsinore. The book released Tuesday, May 20, 2014, is narrated by "The Hobbit" actor Richard Armitage.  AP
This audio book cover image released by Audible Inc. shows “Hamlet: Prince of Denmark,” by A.J. Hartley and David Hewson. Audible Inc., the world’s largest seller of downloadable audiobooks, has followed the success of their recent novelization of “Macbeth” with a new thriller about the moody prince of Elsinore. The book released Tuesday, May 20, 2014, is narrated by “The Hobbit” actor Richard Armitage. AP

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Denmark, perhaps better known for its fictional, suicide-agonizing prince Hamlet and fierce marauding Vikings than being a nation of the happiest people, has just won that very accolade. Again.

The United Nations has made it official: It found Danes to be the happiest people on Earth, in a study of 156 countries.

Knud Christensen, a 39-year-old social worker, knows one reason why his compatriots are laid-back — they feel secure in a country with few natural disasters, little corruption and a near absence of drastic events.

“We have no worries,” Christensen said smiling, as he stood on a Copenhagen street near the capital’s City Hall. “And if we do worry, it’s about the weather. Will it rain today, or remain gray or will it be cold?” TVJ

 

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