Scientists say Shakespeare's skull may be missing from grave | Inquirer Lifestyle

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FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 21, 2009 file photo, Head Verger Jon Ormrod tends to the grave of William Shakespeare in the Chancel of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford Upon Avon, England. Archeologists who scanned the grave of William Shakespeare say they have made a startling discovery: His skull appears to be missing. The researchers used ground-penetrating radar to explore beneath the playwright's tomb in Stratford-upon-Avon's Holy Trinity Church. Kevin Colls, who led the study, said the team found "an odd disturbance at the head end." He said Thursday, March 24, 2016 the finding lends support to a claim that the Bard's skull was stolen by grave-robbers in the 18th century. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, file)

Scientists say Shakespeare’s skull may be missing from grave

FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 21, 2009 file photo, Head Verger Jon Ormrod tends to the grave of William Shakespeare in the Chancel of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford Upon Avon, England. Archeologists who scanned the grave of William Shakespeare say they have made a startling discovery: His skull appears to be missing. The researchers used ground-penetrating radar to explore beneath the playwright's tomb in Stratford-upon-Avon's Holy Trinity Church. Kevin Colls, who led the study, said the team found "an odd disturbance at the head end." He said Thursday, March 24, 2016 the finding lends support to a claim that the Bard's skull was stolen by grave-robbers in the 18th century.  (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, file)
In this September 2009 photo, head verger Jon Ormrod tends to the grave of William Shakespeare in the Chancel of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford Upon Avon, England. AP

LONDON—Archeologists who scanned the grave of William Shakespeare say they have made a startling discovery: His skull appears to be missing.

The researchers used ground-penetrating radar to explore beneath the playwright’s tomb in Stratford-upon-Avon’s Holy Trinity Church. Kevin Colls, who led the study, said the team found “an odd disturbance at the head end.”

He said Thursday the finding lends support to a claim that the Bard’s skull was stolen by grave-robbers in the 18th century.

Colls said “it’s very, very convincing to me that his skull isn’t at Holy Trinity at all.”

But Patrick Taylor, vicar of the church, said he was not convinced there is “sufficient evidence to conclude that his skull has been taken.” He said there are no plans to disturb the grave to find out.

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