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PH market keeps growing for Coach—for reasons beyond Selena Gomez

American heritage brand opens flagship store with items ranging from classic to contemporary
/ 05:27 AM December 07, 2018

The women’s section features the latest Dreamer collection and its popular styles.

Bags designed in the mid-century and updated in modern colors and fine leather spell chic in the window display of the new Coach boutique at Power Plant Mall, Makati City.

Coach’s heritage collection, revitalized by creative director Stuart Vevers, aims to lure the cosmopolitan traveler.

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Near the entrance, the store has introduced the latest collection, Dreamer, now a hit worldwide. Less structured than the other bags, Dreamer is a tote made of smooth and embossed leather, with the fashionable hardware and trademark C hang tag. Some versions are color-blocked or have border rivets.

There’s a section of luxury streetwear and another filled with items designed by brand ambassador Selena Gomez.

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Another section offers  monogramming with a wide assortment of emojis.

The designs come with rosette prints, suds and Rexxy hang tag.

T-shirts, sneakers

During the soft opening, the items that were quickly snapped up were the easy-fit cotton T-shirts embroidered with Rexy, Coach’s mascot dinosaur, and the C11 patterned designer sneakers with the brand’s signature hang tag. The T-shirt and the sneakers fetched P15,000 each.

Cool brand

“We are a cool, New York fashion brand,” said Emmanuel Ruelland, vice president and general manager for Southeast Asia at Tapestry Inc., the corporate name of the multibrand retailer including Coach.

“We are targeting not just the millennials but also a broad range of customers by being relevant. We are not classic, traditional luxury,” he said.

In the first few weeks, the most salable bags at Coach were investments for everyday use.  The Charlie carryall with interchangeable strap has been the top seller in the prince range of P27,000 to P48,000.

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Based on sales, the Philippine market looks for functionality. Other best sellers were the Prairie satchel, with detachable straps for a crossbody look; the Camera bag, inspired by the mid-century camera cases that open to a spacious interior; and the soft, slouchy Edie 31.

Emmanuel Ruelland, vice president and general manager for Southeast Asia at Tapestry Inc., and SSI Group president Anton Huang

Coach’s male customers prefer casual bags to business bags. The crossbody backpacks, some with a P30,000 price tag, were sold out immediately.

The best-selling styles were inspired by the vintage aviation bags such as the squarish Metropolitan Flight bag with an interior tech pocket and the Dylan Swing bag. Younger male customers favored the boxy Bowery crossbody with a curb chain strap.

According to Ruelland, men comprise 20 percent of the market share.

“This year we are growing close to 30 percent,” he said.

“Customers in different categories are growing because we provide a better assortment. There are more ready-to-wear and footwear to help us expand. They like our services like the monogram and the leather cleaning.”

Aside from updating its heritage collection, developed by designer Bonnie Cashin in the ’60s, Coach also creates new styles according to the preferences of the customers in weight, size and platform.

Ruelland said that Coach has a reputation for the quality of its leather which is sourced from different parts of the world. All the products are made in Southeast Asia.

“It’s not where it’s made that matters, but controlling the quality of the material and craftsmanship,” he said. “The Coach team follows the product development and adheres to strict quality control.” —CONTRIBUTED

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