Rustan’s holds sale-exhibit of Maximo Vicente ‘santos’ | Inquirer Lifestyle
Renee Vicente Francisco with the Our Lady of the Assumption, an original work by her grandfather

Rustan’s holds sale-exhibit of Maximo Vicente ‘santos’

Renee Vicente Francisco with the Our Lady of the Assumption, an original work by her grandfather

 

It had to be moved to a later date, but not even a tremor could stop the opening of the sale-exhibit of a collection of religious icons by sculptor and primero santero Maximo Vicente Sr.

At 5 p.m. on April 22, friends and Assumption classmates of Rustan’s chair and CEO Zenaida “Nedy” Tantoco and Regina Vicente Francisco gathered on the fifth floor of Rustan’s Makati, for the opening of the sale-exhibit of the 90-plus collection, the last remaining samples from the Vicente taller, the oldest workshop for religious iconography in the Philippines. It was established in Quiapo in 1908.

Francisco, Vicente’s eldest grandchild and custodian of the collection left by her parents, Maximo Jr. and Soledad Vicente, was joined by her sister, children and grandchildren.

 

Sacred Heart

Patrons

Former first lady Imelda Marcos and philanthropist Danny Dolor, sometime patrons of the Talleres de Maximo Vicente, were invited to cut the ceremonial ribbon, with Ambassador Bienvenido Tantoco Sr. and his daughter Nedy. Tantoco’s other daughters, Marilen Tantoco and Maritess Enriquez, were also present.

Shortly before the program started, the ground shook. And while other guests scurried to find cover, the senior guests remained calm. Marcos was heard to have said she felt safer where she was than if she were in her high-rise condo.

Concerned for everyone’s safety, Tantoco carried on with the program swiftly. (The department store was evacuated and closed as precautionary measure soon after.)

 

Our Lady of Remedios

 

Marilen Tantoco, Rustan’s vice president for home merchandising, told Inquirer Lifestyle most of the icons were already sold, save for the life-size Our Lady of the Assumption, the last original work of Vicente, who died in 1964, and a few smaller pieces. All the samples are over 50 years old.

Vicente’s works can be found in the homes of wealthy collectors as well as big churches all over the country. After his death, his son Maximo Jr. and his wife Soledad ran the taller with carvers trained in Vicente’s style, which reputedly was on par with santeros in Europe.

The sale-exhibit is until May 6. —CVM

 

Our Lady of Sorrows

 

Zenaida Tantoco, chair and CEO (center, standing), with Mars Lambino, Danny Dolor, Marites Tantoco Enriquez and Marilen Tantoco; (seated) Rustan’s chair emeritus Ambassador Bienvenido Tantoco Sr., former first lady Imelda Marcos and Minerva Tanseco —Photos by LEO M. SABANGAN II

 

Dina Tantoco, Sister Estella, Renee Francisco and Marites Tantoco Enriquez