Dear Mr. President | Inquirer Lifestyle

Helping her hometown

Seventeen-year-old Rav James M. Lopez was at her grandparents’ house in Gattaran, Cagayan, when Typhoon “Ulysses” (international name: Vamco) hit. “We were very…

Dear Mr. President

I would like to ask if you could somehow encourage the ratification of the Freedom of Information Bill (FOI) in Congress, so that it would be approved immediately.

As a student, I may not know everything there is to know about politics, but from a citizen’s point of view, I believe its benefits could outweigh the costs.

The FOI bill could bring a lot of issues, controversies and even a big chance of misunderstanding when the information is released, but after all is said and done, I believe disclosure is still the best.

Disclosure through the FOI bill could encourage the populace to become active citizens. It would also promote democracy in our country by letting the voters know how their candidates are doing their job. In doing so, the government would be giving responsibility to the people to become active citizens, whose job would be to analyze and criticize the government.

Sincerely,

Juan Paolo Banadera

Your presence, please

Good day. I’m in favor of what you are doing with our country, but there are some things you might want to give attention to. One is your presence. There are times I feel like we don’t have a president. I don’t know if it’s just me or if there is really something wrong. Another one—the crime and political issues. Some politicians who are accused of crimes are not punished. I hope you’ll do something about that.

Thank you.

Pauline Reyes

De La Salle University

Trust our Lord

With all that pressure because of people’s expectations, please do take time to rest and be silent in God’s presence. He will be the only one who can help you, to direct your vision down the right path, as you said during your campaign, and to push for a daang matuwid.  There is no other way for you but to trust our Lord and let Him help you throughout your term.

As we all know, your world is full of temptations, but I believe that if you hold on to our Lord and keep his words in your heart, you will be able to overcome these temptations and lead the country according to His guidance. Mr. President, your people might talk behind your back and betray you, but as our Lord promised, he will never leave you nor forsake you.

You are the only hope of this nation, and with the help of our Lord Jesus Christ, you will be able to restore the glory and life of our beloved country.

Hanniel S. Almasco

Ateneo de Manila University

Poor in English

Dear Mr. President,

I am a human resources manager, and I noticed that very few applicants have finished college, and if so, they have low English proficiency. I hope that during your administration, public education in the Philippines can be of higher quality.

Yours truly,

Pauline Ylaya

Ateneo de Manila alumnus

Different ’70s

In the 1960s and 1970s, a wave of nationalism swept the youth, and the students felt as if they could actually make a difference. Whenever I reflect on those times, I cannot help but be amazed at the fervor these young people—in following their ideals—to the extent that they were willing to suffer injury for their beliefs.

That was a far cry from today, when a vast majority of the youth would rather accept that society would not change just because they think it should. I am writing because I feel that this is an issue that needs to be addressed, for this kind of mindset is bound to affect the country in the long run.

Sincerely,

Kim Grace Lumibao

Ateneo de Manila University

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