'Whitening' creams undergo a makeover but colorism persists | Inquirer Lifestyle
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Some cosmetics including skin care and so-called "bihaku" products, based on the Japanese characters for "beauty" and "white," are sold at a drugstore in Tokyo Thursday, July 2, 2020. In the wake of mass protests against racial injustice in the U.S., these corporations are re-branding their skin lightening products in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, but for generations of women raised on their messaging, the new marketing is unlikely to reverse deeply rooted prejudices around “colorism”, the idea that fair skin is better than dark skin. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko) WHITENING
Some cosmetics including skin care and so-called "bihaku" products, based on the Japanese characters for "beauty" and "white," are sold at a drugstore in Tokyo Thursday, July 2, 2020. In the wake of mass protests against racial injustice in the U.S., these corporations are re-branding their skin lightening products in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, but for generations of women raised on their messaging, the new marketing is unlikely to reverse deeply rooted prejudices around “colorism”, the idea that fair skin is better than dark skin. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

‘Whitening’ creams undergo a makeover but colorism persists