This summer, why not learn how to act on stage…and more

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Stage Campers doing a “Les Miz” number. Classes at 9 Works Theatrical, says artistic director Robbie Guevara, have a very personal and hands-on approach. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/9 Works Theatrical

MANILA, Philippines—This summer, why not bring theater appreciation to the next level by learning how to act? Various theater groups are conducting acting workshops—basic and advance—fit for children, teenagers and adults.

Then again, could a month-long training be enough?

“One summer will not make one an actor already because the craft is a lifelong study but it will certainly teach the child (or student) to appreciate his/her God-given talent and start him/her on the road to self discovery,” says well-known veteran of the stage, actor-director-singer-producer Audie Gemora.

‘If only to understand yourself better, learning how to act is a big help,” says another veteran of the live stage, actor-director Fernando ‘Tata’ Nanding Josef.

Josef is artistic director of Tanghalang Pilipino (TP), the resident theater group of the Cultural Center of the Philippines. This summer he will facilitate advance classes on “Acting for TV, Film and Commercials”.

Gemora co-runs Trumpets, Stages Inc. and the soon-to-open Talent School Of Academics and the Arts in Makati City.

Besides acting, various theater groups run workshops on directing, stage design, lighting design, singing, dancing and even playwriting. Each offers its own time-tested techniques that a student can choose.

Workshops at the CCP

If location is a major consideration, TP offers a month-long program conducted in various venues right inside the CCP building.

This could be ideal for residents of Manila, Makati and nearby cities and municipalities in Cavite like Bacoor, Imus and Dasmariñas, where most TP actors reside.
TP’s program ends with a recital held at the CCP’s 220-seat Experimental Theater or the Tanghalang Huseng Batute, “where students get the chance to be seen by talent scouts.”

This year, TP actors Marco Viana, Remus Villanueva, Jonathan ‘Tad’ Tadioan Doray Dayao and Ralph Mateo handle the basic and advanced workshops for children.

Audie Gemora believes acting is a life-long study. INQUIRER file photo

For young adults (13-16 years old), the course introduces creative drama, music, writing movement and visual arts that explore youth-oriented themes. This is facilitated by Regina de Vera and Jovanni Cadag.

Beginning acting (17 years old and above) is described “a practical application of the rudiments of acting, including concentration, spontaneity, improvisation, confidence, body and voice preparation, characterization and script analysis to create a unique, authentic life on stage.” This is facilitated by Tuxqs Rutaquio (Ada/Zsa Zsa Zaturnahh) and Niccolo Magno.

Though most of them took up different courses in college, the facilitators are also products of summer workshops.

Tadioan or Tad is a Mass Communications graduate from Far Eastern University who took the 2005 TP summer workshop. Though De Vera finished theater arts in Ateneo, she still availed of   TP’s acting class in 2008. In 2012, in the same batch were Magno, (creative writing major), Mateo (hotel and restaurant management), Dayao (accounting) and Cadag (biology).  Viana is reportedly an electronics engineering graduate.
There is also production and stage management course facilitated by Ed Murillo

Advanced classes are conducted in Arts In the City at the Bonifacio Global City in Taguig City. Guest facilitators are Josef on “Acting for TV, Film and Commercials” on May 7-9 & 14-16, 2013 (T-Th), from 9am-12nn. Rody Vera will conduct “Interpreting Shakespeare” on May 21-23 & 28-30, 2013 (T-Th) 9am-12nn also at Arts In the City.

The workshop fee is Php8,000.00 (nnclusive of all materials & recital fee). For inquiries on TP workshops, call  (02) 822-6920 / 8323661 / 8321125 loc. 1620 / 1621 and look for Lorelei Celestino or email tanghalanprod@yahoo.com or visit Tanghalang Pilipino Foundation, Inc. 2/F PDC Bldg., CCP Complex, Roxas Blvd., Pasay City.

TP also offers customized workshop in any organization or school as far as the provinces.

 

Peta’s integrated theater arts approach

Ideal for those in the Quezon City area, the Peta workshops are conducted at the Peta Theater Center at number 5 Eymard Drive, Brgy. Kristong Hari, New Manila. The 50-year-old theater organization uses its unique Integrated Theater Arts approach, which “combines the different disciplines of theater, such as creative drama, sounds and music, body movements and dance, creative writing, and visual arts.”

Besides the usual courses, Peta also offers Theater in Education series for educators.

In a recent statement, Peta says due to the increasing number of summer workshop applicants, its School of People’s Theater recently opened four additional classes of its most in-demand courses: Children’s Theater, Teen Theater and Theater Arts.

Fernando ‘Tata Nanding’ Josef, artistic director of Tanghalang Pilipino. INQUIRER file photo

“PETA’s summer courses, which range from acting for beginners to advanced training for professional actors and teachers, attract a lot of applicants every year because of its unique and comprehensive program,” said Peta.

“Through the Basic Integrated Theater Arts Workshop (Bitaw) process, Peta Artist-Teachers combine group dynamics, creative dance and movement, creative sound and music, visual art and creative writing into one fun-filled workshop,” it added.

“Throughout Peta’s 45-years of experience in educational theater and cultural work, Bitaw has been the company’s main foundation in all of its trainings including those conducted in the provinces of the Philippines, regional coverage in Asia, Europe and Latin America.

“Peta’s student-centered workshops also highlight the limitless creative potential of each participant, allowing students to fully express themselves, boost their confidence, and mount their own stories into original productions.

“The month-long classes held at The Peta Theater Center are culminated by a full showcase at the 400-seater Peta-Phinma Theater, giving each participant the chance to shine under the limelight of a legitimate stage.”

The 2013 Peta Summer Program offers Children’s Theater 1 (for ages 6 to 8), Children Theater 2 (for ages 9 to 12), Teen Theater (for ages 13 to 16), Theater Arts, Basic Acting and Creative Musical Theater (for ages 17 and up). For inquiries, contact PETA at (02) 725-6244, 0906-2115003, 0916-3090707 or send an email to petatheater@gmail.com.

To join the Peta Summer Program, please schedule an interview for enrollment through 725-6244, 410-0821, 0916-3090707, or petatheater@gmail.com.

Broadway, Shakespeare, anything English

Gemora discusses Trumpets Playshop, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary.

He considers it the country’s first multi-media summer workshop. “Whereas other summer programs used to be just limited to drama, Playshop pioneered courses like street dancing, musical theater, children’s theater, modeling, public speaking, photography, song and dance, Starpower with the company, summer stock, voice, instruments, script writing, stage management, scene study,” he said.

Learn and live what’s “Integrated Theater Arts approach” means at the Philippine Educational Educational Theater Association. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/Peta

It has produced countless artists now active in all areas of entertainment and media like Christian Bautista, Sam Concepcion, Tippy dos Santos, Gian Magdangal, Joaquin Valdez, Bituin Escalante, Carlo Lorenzo, Nina Corpuz, Bianca Gonzalez, to name a few.

Practically all the current young theater actors studied at Playshop. And all the streetdancing clubs in schools had their origins with Playshop.

Playshop 2013 starts on April 8 in its Musicademy main studio at the 5th level of Shangri-La Mall and its satellite branches at the Podium, Alabang and Global City. Inquiries at 6362842 and 6317252 or visit www.trumpetsplayshop.com.

Not exactly a new kid on the block, 9 Works Theatrical has developed its own approach for its three Stage Camp summer theater workshops—Kiddie & Pre-Teen Camp, Teen Camp and Adult Camp—now on its fourth year at the Loft, Manansala Tower in Rockwell Center, Makati City

“It’s a very personal and hands-on approach to our campers. It’s a relationship and continuous learning that extends outside of workshop’s four walls,” says Robbie Guevara, artistic director of 9 Works Theatrical.

Guevara proudly enumerates some of their summer workshoppers who have done professional production with them:  Harold Irvin Cruz (The Wedding Singer, Rent); Peachy Atilano (The Wedding Singer, Rent, They’re Playing Our Song); Jonjon Martin (The Wedding Singer); Toff de Venecia (You’re a Goodman Charlie Brown).

The workshops are scheduled from April 8 to May 26 at the Loft, or a total of six weeks with a culminating showcase on either May 25 or 26 at the Carlos P. Romulo Auditorium in RCBC.

Guevara admits it’s not an overnight thing.

“Being an actor is a long process but enrolling in a summer workshop in musical theater is a step to prepare yourself to be an actor. Enrolling hones your talent.  It teaches you the proper techniques and gives you a chance to experience what is like to be on stage,” he said.

He added: “To be an actor it requires a lot of things—a continuous training in singing, dancing and acting, you must be expose in all field of arts, always update yourself on the things that are happening in the world of theatre and you must have the discipline and passion to it. If you are an actor you must never stop from learning.”

For Stage Camp inquiries, call 586-7105 or 0917-5545560 or email info@9workstheatrical.com. Or visit www.9workstheatrical.com or www.facebook.com/9workstheatrical.

Repertory Philippines, one of the longest-running theater company, also offers its workshops for kids, pre-teens and adults starting April 8 in three venues; Legaspi Village in Makati City, Bonifacio Global City in Taguig City and in its Ortigas main rehearsal studio.

For Taguig City, kiddie classes are handled by Ayam Eckstein and Hans Eckstein. Pre-teens classes are facilitated by Cara Barredo and Reb Atadero. For teens classes, there’s Naths Everett and Dingdong Rosales

For the Ortigas classes: Kiddie (Deana Aquino and Bulinggit Delgado); Pre-teens and Teens (Oliver Usison and Ring Antonio); Adults (Jamie Wilson and Gold Soon)

For Makati: Advance acting classes will be handled by Joel Trinidad

For inquiries, call Repertory Philippines at 571-6926, 571-4941 or email info@repertory-philippines.com.

Disclaimer: The comments uploaded on this site do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of management and owner of INQUIRER.net. We reserve the right to exclude comments that we deem to be inconsistent with our editorial standards.

  • bgc

    Will acting lessons advance society? It’s one of the most useless crafts in the world if not the most.

    PDI should instead publish reports/articles how to make pinoys from all walks of life innovative, entrepreneurial and more discerning of the socio-economic issues. We lag behind our neighboring countries for one because we are largely superficial people. We endear image per se. And most of us do not value real skills (e.g doing high-quality research, inventing/innovating, business modelling) that RP needs to compete at the global stage.

    • http://twitter.com/squidvillanueva Randy Villanueva

      So, basically, you’re saying:

      Stop liking things that I don’t like!

      • bgc

        No. What I’m saying is that it is time for most pinoys to go beyond their superficial sub-mediocre mindset if they want this nation to move forward. Pinoys envy certain countries for their economic progress but they are not doing their share to push RP to achieve the level that these countries are currently in. Pinoys rely so much on their government to do the work for them.

        If you want to recommend something to the youth (at least in this case) this summer, recommend something that would advance societal welfare. This country badly needs innovative and technically-capable future generation. And you recommend acting in times of critical economic transformation? What does acting contribute to the economy anyway?

        Oh well, some will probably argue along the lines of “to each his own” as it has always been the case in Pinoy culture. But this is also the reason why RP is lagging behind its neighboring states in terms of technological sophistication (i.e. our own creations) and quality of life. From a good friend: “pinoys are generally artsy but shallow, logically less astute, emotional (influenced by tv dramas perhaps) and short-sighted”… Note, my friend said “generally” and not everyone. There are extremely good Pinoys in technical work and fields of vital economic importance. But they are not that many. I just hope that they do increase their number exponentially in the next few years. Acting is definitely not the way to go.

      • http://twitter.com/squidvillanueva Randy Villanueva

        There is no room for art in this vision of yours? Or at least art that you don’t agree with?

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