‘Magnificat,’ new album of priest-composer Fr. Carlo Magno Marcelo, to be launched | Lifestyle.INQ

‘Magnificat,’ new album of priest-composer Fr. Carlo Magno Marcelo, to be launched

Multi-awarded priest songwriter/composer Fr. Carlo Magno Marcelo will launch his newest album, “Magnificat,” featuring the talented music artist-singer Geli Federoso interpreting songs on the theme of transitions, on July 14, 2:30 p.m., at the San Carlos Seminary auditorium.

 

A priest of the Archdiocese of Manila, Fr. Marcelo is known for composing songs to highlight important Church events and personages. Among his works are “The Jubilee Song” (1996); “Only Selfless Love” (2003); “Awit sa Ina ng Santo Rosaryo” (2005). Currently the dean of seminarians and director of the Theology Department of the San Carlos Seminary, Fr. Marcelo has also held posts in the Archdiocesan Liturgical Commission, Manila.

 

He co-founded the Jubilee Music Ministry in 1998 to promote Catholic music and to help institutions that need financial assistance especially in producing quality music albums.

 

As the daughter of the choirmaster at a parish, Geli Federoso, started singing at 3 years old and has not stopped since then, winning singing competitions along the way.  She was a four-year Kundiman champ in high school and a National Music Competitions for Young Artists finalist. She has had concerts with renowned music artists. While able to tackle skillfully both pop and R&B, Geli’s forte is Gospel-inspired songs. She sang the theme song of the Asia Youth Day 2009.

 

The Magnificat album combines the soulful composition of Fr. Carlo with the heartfelt rendition of Geli to finely delineate life’s transition moments.

 

Featured in the album are songs and their “transition moments”: “Magnificat,” sadness to joy; “Ang Pananalig,” darkness to light; “Our Prayer: Serviam,” love will always stay; “Awit sa Ina, Higit sa Isang Pamana,” death to eternal life; “Lord, I Seek Your Face,” absence to presence; “In this Place,” being lost to finding a home; and “Most Sweet Jesus,” complacency to mission.