Teppanyaki show, Alabang version | Inquirer Lifestyle

Teppanyaki show, Alabang version

 

 

Teppanyaki, the Japanese style of cooking, involves an iron grill (teppan), and grilling, roasting and frying food (yaki). From ancient Japan to the present, it’s been one of the most popular cooking methods in Japanese restaurants, probably because of the traditional “show” performed by the chef before awestruck diners.

Teppanyaki Japanese Restaurant Second Level, Evia Lifestyle Center, Daang Hari, Alabang

The restaurant—in black with touches of golden yellow—is impressive and elegant, dramatic even. There are individual teppanyaki booths presided over by a chef.

Diners are greeted by a kimono-clad young lady who endorses guests to a male attendant who leads them to their tables.

Dining area: Each booth, with a chef, sits six to eight diners.

Kitchen: This faces the guests who can watch the cooking. This is where the “entertainment” begins. The chef walks in with his utensils, basically two butchers’ knives and two ladles, along with the ingredients—meat, chicken, seafood, vegetables, eggs, seasonings, oil.

The chef performs a routine that Japanese chefs have done down the centuries. To Japanese music, he juggles the knives as in a swordplay, making a variety of moves, like swinging the knives around his neck.

To make fried rice, he makes an egg “dance” on one of the ladles before breaking it. It is truly amazing to watch these tricks.

Service: Quick and efficient.

Staff: They wear a smile and are very helpful.

What to order: A bowl of soup to start off the meal. The grills can be beef, chicken or seafood, with sauteed vegetables and fried rice. Each dish is served as soon it gets cooked.

Our choice was the soft and flavorful chicken, while the others went for the tender premium beef. The fried rice is, by far, the best in flavor we’ve had.

Service charge and government tax are added to the bill. Senior cards are honored.

Rating – 3 Spoons

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