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Sculpture show fashions form out of formlessness

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“UNTITLED,” by Kelly Sonio

A favorite movie of Michael Cacnio is “The Agony and the Ecstasy,” the biographical film on Michelangelo, so it comes as no surprise he looks up to the Renaissance master who said of his creative process: “I saw an angel in the marble and I carved to set him free.”

Cacnio is one of over 40 sculptors who fashion forms out of amorphous masses and assorted media at the 8th Annual Sculpture Review, on view until Sept. 30 in Megamall’s Art Center. The exhibit, organized by Gallery Nine, is the biggest all-sculpture show in the country.

Cacnio’s cut-and-soldered brass piece, “In Between,” shows a little lad between a pair of hands. The lad is presented in the sculptor’s trademark naïf style, but the hands are rendered classically.

But it seems it is Agi Pagkatipunan who has seen an angel in the stone. From a huge rock slab he has formed “Supling,” showing a parent figure in undefined and rough finish so as to highlight the smoothly glistening angelic infant.

In painted terra-cotta is Kelly Sonio’s silver-winged, suit-clad angel bound by red sash and further encircled by bald, white-headed ethnic figures. The totem-pole composition could be a lament on wrongful persecution, like persons burned at the stake.

Vanity

“IN BETWEEN,” by Michael Cacnio

Pete Jimenez’s metal sculpture is a searing commentary on  vanity and today’s mania for dermatology and cosmetic surgery.  He deliberately ages his medium with acids to present a face that is mottled and tined with green. It has incongruously bent and rusted strips for eyes and a length of tightly coiled spring for a nose. The title of his work is ironic: “Facial.”

Ramon Orlina’s abstract sculpture of a softly arched peach-amber crystal bust flaunts flawlessness.

“SUPLING,” by Agi Pagkatipunan

It is reverence for the highly specialized yet less patronized craft of sculpture that keeps the yearly gathering vibrant. From assemblages such as the relief painted cut-rubber, nails and wood of Leonardo Aguinaldo, to the wooden explorations of Claude Tayag, the spread continues to draw viewers.

Other participants

Also on exhibit are works by National Artist Abdulmari Asia Imao, Donato Alvarez, Ral Arrogante, Fred Baldemor, Wilson William Baldemor, Benjie Bisaya,  Jinggoy Buensuceso, Anastacio Caedo, Florante Caedo, Frederick Caedo, Henri Cainglet, Roen Capule, Jake Catah, Salvador “Buddy” Ching, Joe Geraldo, Juan Sajid Imao, Junyee, Maria Magdamit, Jordan Mendoza, Chris Murillo, Andre Odavar, Carlito Ortega, Al Perez, Ton Raymundo, Farley del Rosario, Danny Rayos del Sol, Omi Reyes, Rodel Rillera, Jinggoy Salcedo, Lirio Salvador, Jonahmar Salvosa, Manolo Sicat, Ian Valladarez, Jun Vicaldo and Jik Villanueva.

Call tel. 9108016 or 0922-8223369.

E-mail author at majorday@gmail.com for comments.


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