Inner Awareness

The reluctant faith healer

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He makes the blind see, the paralytic walk, the deaf hear. He heals all kinds of illnesses through bare-hand psychic surgery, reads people’s minds, and sees the future.

People have seen him levitate in his sleep, and transform ordinary water into oil for healing. His name begins with letter “J.”

I am not referring to Jesus Christ, but to a 76-year-old Filipino faith healer and psychic surgeon from Lopez, Quezon. He prefers to be called Brother Jun (his last name is Santos).

I first met Bro. Jun about 20 years ago in the house of the elder brother of a well-known but controversial judge. I had already forgotten that initial meeting until he reminded me of it when I met him again last year in the mango orchard of Riza Lim in Magalang, Pampanga.

He was performing healing there with Swami Kenji, a Japanese healer who trained under several Filipino healers and mystics.

Unusual

 

Bro. Jun is one of the most unusual and incredible healers I have met in my decades of studying Filipino healers.

Why do I say this? First, almost all the faith healers in the Philippines started as members of a spiritual group, called the Union Espiritista Christiana de Filipinas, where they learned the art of automatic writing, going into trance, contacting their spirit guides and later performing the sensational bare-hand psychic surgery which is unique to the Philippines.

Brazilian faith healers and psychic surgeons use knives and other instruments to open up the body and make incisions. Filipino healers use only their bare hands.

Second, Bro. Jun says he became a psychic surgeon instantaneously, without any preparation and without even knowing who his spirit guide was, unlike other faith healers I’ve met here and in Brazil.

For example, Tony Agpaoa told me his spirit guide was St. Martin de Porres, Emilio Laporga’s was Mary Magdalene. Brazilian healer Jose Arigo’s guide was a deceased German doctor of medicine named Dr. Adolf Fritz. And a British psychic surgeon named Stephen Turoff I met in London said his guide was a deceased Egyptian carpenter.

Guided by Christ?

Bro. Jun came to know his spirit guide only much later. It was, according to him, Jesus Christ himself. Same claim made by Jun Labo regarding his spirit guide.

Third, Bro. Jun said he never thought he would become a spiritual healer because he was very worldly. “I was a gambler, a drinker, a smoker, a womanizer and a trouble maker in my younger days.”

So how did he become a healer?

 

He was around 28 or 29 when he met a serious accident while riding on his motorcycle. His face was smashed and he suffered broken bones. He was in the hospital for months.

He spent a year in bed, paralyzed.

While in bed at home, he saw a young girl climb the mango tree in front of their house. She suddenly fell to the ground.

Without hesitation he jumped out of the bed and rushed to the half-conscious girl. He rubbed or massaged her back and was shocked to see his hand enter the girl’s body and blood start oozing out. The girl recovered shortly after that.

Reluctant healer

 

From then on, word spread that he could heal. Very reluctant of his newfound and unexpected ability, he tried to hide from people.

His mother, a devout Catholic, forbade him to do that kind of healing, thinking that it came from the dark side. But people insisted on seeing him. He could no longer refuse.

He told me he became rich because of gambling, winning as much as P2 million in a day. And his powers disappeared.

“Only after I gave up all my money and all my vices, did I regain my powers.”

Now, he heals, according to him, without asking anything in return. He would accept donations only enough to help him continue his healing mission.

He says he refuses big or large donations because it would detract from his main purpose or mission, which is to heal all those who come to him.

To make sure he does not depend on his patient’s donations to live, he went into the poultry and piggery business. He earns just enough to live modestly.

He has healed many important, well-known and wealthy Filipinos whose names I cannot reveal. They read like a Who’s Who of Philippine society.

Content

 

“I am contented with life as it is now,” he confessed to me. “I have a loving wife, Nancy, who is my constant companion and assistant. We have adopted children who keep us company in my small farm in Lopez, Quezon.”

These adopted children were those abandoned by NPA rebels, or those whose parents have been killed in battle. Some are poor streetchildren. “I used to have 30 of them. Now there are only 13.”

“What happened to the rest?” I asked.

“They were either adopted by other families or found work after school.”

In Magalang, Bro. Jun treated various ailments, such as breast cancer, Parkinson’s disease, witchcraft, infertility, etc. The most unusual patient was Kent who was exposed to harmful radiation after the Fukushima nuclear plant exploded. Although he was living in Tokyo, he was affected. He got tired easily, had difficulty controlling his nervousness, found himself sort of lost.

He didn’t know what was causing his problem. He presumed it must have been nuclear radiation. He came to the Philippines and after Jun’s treatment, he got better and was happy with his recovery.

Turning water into oil

 

Bro. Jun, a miracle worker? Some people believe so, because he is able to transform ordinary water into oil or so it seems.

He demonstrated this before my wife and me. He told me to hold a bottle of water and smell it. It had no smell.

After blessing the water, he asked me to smell it again and this time it smelled like fresh flowers. And the water turned into oil. I don’t know if this was just a clever trick or a real chemical transformation. More in-depth study is needed to confirm Jun’s healing powers.

Note: Attend the next Soulmates, Karma and Reincarnation seminar on May 18, 1-7 p.m., and How to Heal Yourself Through Visualization seminar on May 22, 6-9 p.m., at Rm. 308 Prince Plaza I Legazpi St., Greenbelt, Makati. Call 8107245, 8159890 or 0908-3537885; e-mail jaimetlicauco@yahoo.com; visit www.jimmylicauco.com.

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